Tag Archives: fresh produce

Nutritious Meets Delicious!

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Follow the Big Red Apple (symbol of nutrition, not just the Real Housewives of NYC) as I lead a quick tour of what Dietitians learned (and sometimes laughed about ) at the annual Food and Nutrition Conference #FNCE organized by our professional organization the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

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Thousands of registered dietitian nutritionists from across the nation and around the world met in Boston this week to hear the latest on food, nutrition and cuisine.

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Did someone say Boston? Well then where are the Lobster Rolls?

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Here they are! I had 3…they were small.

My registered dietitian colleague Janet Helm, author of Nutrition Unplugged blog is a trend spotting master. Here she is in action on the exhibit floor of FNCE where food companies, big, small, new and classic strut their nutritious stuff to see if dietitians will bite. Sometimes we love it and tell you all about it…and sometimes have to spit it out. But thanks for trying food folks.

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Registered dietitian Janet Helm, top taste trend spotter!

Here are a few of Janet’s food photos from FNCE and a few of mine. Thank you Janet Helm.

Build a better noodle: noodles made from beans, peas and other ‘pulses’ to boost protein and add variety to the ever-lovin’ noodle category.

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Classic pastas count for good nutrition too! I like Barilla pastas with a boost of protein from beans in the mix.

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Go to Gut Health:  Sure gluten-free is a trend but nutrition advice goes way beyond gluten to help folks improve their gut health. Pro-biotics is a hot topic because these foods (vegetables, fermented foods such as yogurt and even sauerkraut, and other foods and drinks packed with friendly bacteria are emerging as a lively category).

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Seeing Seeds Everywhere: Who doesn’t love sunflower seeds? sesame seeds? Well, guess what they’re good for our health because they are little power packs of good nutrition. How do you think a plant grows from a seed? I like to add a handful of toasted sunflower seeds to salads for taste, crunch ( instead of friend croutons) and great nutrition.

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Sprouted grains ( from the seeds of the plant) are trending in baked goods too. Small bakeries may have started it but now even old favorites such as Pepperidge Farm are in on the sprouted grains trend. I like the nutty taste.

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YO! There’s a LOT of Yogurt here! 

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Chobani cheers for savory recipes using their Greek Yogurt including whole milk yogurts.

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Grab a spoon because yogurt is a pro-biotic food, good for your gut, made of delicious  dairy with so many nutrients including protein, calcium and potassium. Guess what? Even folks with lactose intolerance can often enjoy cultured dairy products, such as yogurt.

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Hey Siggi, all the way from Iceland, going BIG for Icelandic “SYR” their deliciously rich and creamy yogurt. That’s #therealSiggi in the photo.

And Dannon, which I remember to be the original yogurt introduced to American palates, is still going strong. I love their Light & Fit yogurts. They threw a yoga party for dietitians. Oh wow, aerial yoga? Ever try this?

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Serious Sides for Nutrition Truths Today:

-Remember that nutrition is a hot topic so it attracts a lot of click bait on the internet, which means NOT all of the information is going to be accurate!

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-Trust a registered dietitian nutritionist RDN when they are quoted in the media. We are trained academically and professionally to translate the latest research findings into easy to understand food shopping, cooking and eating out advice.

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Rachel Berman of Verywell.com, Janet Helm and I…presented a session called “Consulting Dr. Google” – how to navigate the choppy waters of nutrition advice on the web today.
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Love sushi? Fish, all kinds, are a lean protein. Some fish, salmon and tuna are higher in healthy Omega-3 fats.

-The 2015 US Dietary Guidelines for Americans are 500 pages long, recommending we cut back on sugar, salt and saturated fats and eat more fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean proteins…but can be translated (by me) into this little phrase:

“Eat a little bit of naughty, and a lot of Nice.” – Carolyn O’Neil, MS RDN LD

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For more information on Food, Nutrition and Healthy Cuisine have fun visiting  the website of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics for all kinds of great ideas for good nutrition.

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See you next year #FNCE for the 100th Anniversary of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.
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Thank you RDN pals, Jenna Braddock, Holly Grainger and so many more….

 

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Farmers Market Finds

Peachtree Road Farmers Market in Atlanta 

Shopping at your local farmers market is more popular than ever.


Farmers meet consumers one-on-one to sell their just-picked crops and suggest the best ways to cook them.

Friends and neighbors, often with their kids and dogs in tow, chat about the weekend and compare purchases.

Where are the fresh baked dog biscuits? 


Crazy colored heirloom tomatoes! Purple potatoes! 

Don’t know how to cook a Japanese eggplant? As the farmer!


Candy-striped beets! Sweet corn, peaches, okra and onions. Locally made goat cheese and honey! Asiago cheese bread!

The taste benefits drive shoppers to farmers’ markets but the health benefits of enjoying freshly picked fruits and vegetables are a big attraction, too. Add to that the good feeling of supporting local farmers and food producers with your purchases and farmers’ markets are a great place to shop.

Have lunch at the Famers Market too!

But, how do you choose the best peaches? The ripest tomatoes? And what do you do with that strange looking squash?

Farmers Market Secrets   Watch CBS Better Mornings Video Here! 


Farmers Market Shopping List of Tips:

-Try to get there early! Look on line for list of farmers and food producers who attend each Farmers’ Market to help plan ahead. I go to the Peachtree Road Farmers Market on Saturdays. 


I get everything from ears of corn to cute earrings from the artisans there. 



Chili Ristas and Turquoise Jewelry at Santa Fe Farmers Market



-Jump into the season: what’s seasonal now? If it is in season it will taste best and cost less

Chef Charles Dale power shops for tonight’s menu at the Santa Fe Farmers Market


-Talk to the farmers, if they grew it, they are happy to tell you how to cook it. Don’t be shy! Hey farmers are the new celebrities!!!


-Buy some ripe, and buy some not so ripe!!! That way the harder peaches or greener tomatoes will ripen up during the week so if you buy on Saturday, they’ll be just right on Wednesday. Actually, produce is so often so fresh at the market, it’ll stay fresh for a week. Then it’s time to go back!


-Imperfections can taste best, the “ugliest” tomato is likely to be an heirloom variety with more tomato flavor. Try varieties or vegetables you’ve never tasted before.

-Bring your own reusable bags to be earth friendly – but please folks – make sure they’re clean!!! Did you know that dirty bags can contaminate your perfect produce? 

Goodies for dining and decor at the Santa Fe Farmers Market, nice hat.


– Have small bills in cash. It will be easier and faster to make transactions with the farmers and producers. Credit cards are a pain and they cost the farmer money. Be a friend to the farmer! 


-Look for perishable foods such as cheeses, yogurts and sausages displayed on ICE!  Food safety is important.  And have a cooler with ice in the car to place perishable purchases.

Chef Demos teach kids ( uh, and all of us ) how great fresh foods taste!


-Create a Farmers’ Market Ready Pantry at home with staples such as whole-wheat flour, granola cereals, canola oil, olive oils, and spices to turn those fresh finds into fabulous dishes. 




I like to bake peaches and top with Sunbelt Bakery Granola to make a Peach Granola Crunch.      
   

Baked Peach Granola Crunch with Sunbelt Bakery Granola

Happy and Healthy Shopping at the Farmers Market of your choice, folks!

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Farmers Market Month!

August is for Farmers  
Saturdays start early for farmers market fans who grab re-usable shopping bags, jostle for parking spaces and hit the stands.  As the saying goes, the early bird catches the worm and in this case it’s the best tasting pickings of fresh produce, herbs, flowers, artisanal cheeses, organic eggs and just-baked breads.  It’s also the place your likely to learn about the foods you’re buying from the same folks who grew the vegetables or made the cheese. Overheard at the Peachtree Road Farmers Marketone recent Saturday; a woman attracted to a beautiful display of heirloom tomatoes but hesitant to buy asked the farmer, “How do I know which ones to pick?”  He replied, “Well, it depends when you want to eat them. If you want them for today choose the really ripe red ones. If you want them for a few days from now choose the firmer ones that will ripen on the kitchen counter.”  She smiled and began her personal harvest from the farmer’s selection.

More Farmers Markets

 August is National Farmers Market Month and just released statistics from the US Department of Agriculture shows a 9.6 increase in the number of farmers markets over the past year. While Georgia can’t beat California’s 827 or New York’s 647 markets, the percent growth in the Southeast region beats the national average with 13.1 percent more farmers market listed in the 2012 edition of the USDA’s National Farmers Market Directory, compared to 2011.  Marilyn Wright Yon, dietitian with the School Nutrition Program for Georgia’s Department of Education likes to visit farmers markets so much she seeks them out in other towns when on vacation, “You find amazing things and meet really interesting people.” She recommends bringing a small cooler especially if purchasing cheese, eggs or meats and says, “Buy something new to you to try.  Ask how to prepare it if needed.”

Chefs and Farmers

Another crop showing up at farmers markets is the chef! Chef demos are often part of the entertainment and education for shoppers. The Peachtree Road Farmers Market and Morningside Farmers Market, for instance, feature local chefs and cookbook authors each week.  Rebecca Lang, author of Quick-Fix Southern showed folks what to do with summer’s bumper crop of corn and tomatoes.

You’ll even see Atlanta area chefs leading private tours of the market.  I saw Linton Hopkins, executive chef of Restaurant Eugene followed by an eager bunch of foodies as he introduced them to farmers and spoke about unusual varieties or especially tasty ones.  Executive chef Thomas McKeown of the Grand Hyatt in Buckhead is a regular at the Peachtree Road Farmers Market too because he drops in to visit one of his favorite farmers, Cory Mosser of Burge Organic Farms of Mansfield, Georgia, “I use Burge’s produce in the hotel restaurant where we have a big commitment to supporting local farms.”  During his recent farmers market recipe demo McKeown prepared local goat cheese mousse with heirloom tomato jam. He’ll be on Mosser’s farm cooking lunch for volunteers pitching in work the fields on Sunday August 19th,  “It’s a crop mob. You’ve heard of a flash mob right?” explains McKeown, “Well this is an organized effort to help farmers with volunteer labor.”

www.crobmobgeorgia.com   A great way to celebrate National Farmers Market Month.  
To Market to Market: 
Tips from Nutrition Experts who Love Farmers Markets

Marilyn Wright Yon, MS, RD:  

Arrive early – right at the start of the market – if you want popular items like strawberries, blueberries, peaches, corn, peas or melons.  These typically go fast when in season. 

Bring change – small bills – for your purchases (some are taking credit cards now with their iPhones and the square thingy). 

Bring your own bags/baskets to carry home as sellers can run out of bags. 

Learn the seasons for your area so you are not disappointed if you do not find tomatoes and melons in May (at least in N Georgia) and decide to not return. 

Visit all the vendors even if you think you are finished with your purchases.  You may find something you would like to try the next week. 

Debbie King, MS RD LD :        
    Take a quick walk around to see what’s available before making purchases     
    If your local farmer will take orders the day before it saves lots of time and if you are running late you know what you ordered will be there.
      Buy your favorites but try one new veggie or fruit each weekLike garlic scapes,  they are not just for table décor.
     Ask other shoppers what they make with what they are buyingI was purchasing tomatoes this summer and another shopper said she was buying tomatoes to make tomato jam.  So when I got home I scoured the internet for good sounding tomato jam recipe and made itIt was a great idea as tomato jam is more like ketchup, so we have enjoyed yummy homemade ketchup on our veggie burgers this summer.
    Carolyn O’Neil, MS RD LD: Atlanta!
    -make sure to wear comfortable shoes, but make sure they’re cute. Lots of hunky farmers here. And guys shopping with their girl friends for Saturday dinner cooking dates. You want to look like you’re shopping for a dinner date, too.
    -make sure to wear something casual but fashionable. Avoid shopping bags that clash with your color combo. Lots of other cute girls with designer sunglasses and trendy designs on their re-useable shopping bags. You are not going for the “Rebecca of SunnyBrook Farm” look either. Avoid braids and gingham,  looks too theme-like. 
    -make sure to have lots of small bills. You don’t want to stress out the organic peach guy by handing him a twenty. Small bills especially important in the early hours of market when farmers and vendors haven’t collected a lot of small bills, yet. 
    -act like your bags are really heavy when you see a cute guy near the organic coffee vendor. It’s a long walk to the car. 


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