Tag Archives: Italy

Pleasures of Pantelleria

In the salted caper room at Bonomo and Giglio on Pantelleria

 

One of my favorite ingredients – whether sprinkled on pizza, tossed into a salad or paired with olive oil and lemon to adorn grilled fish – are capers.  Slightly sweet, mostly salty with a tangy bite capers add a bright note to many dishes.  

Caper plants clinging to the earth bound for Bonomo and Giglio 


Capers are the unopened flower buds of bushy plants that cling to stonewalls or are cultivated close to the ground. On the tiny Italian island of Pantelleria, off the coast of Sicily just 36 miles from the coast of North Africa, the volcanic soil and Mediterranean sun produce high quality capers prized for their flavor. “They are the best capers and I like them because they are cured in salt and not pickled,” says chef Piero Premoli of Pricci Restaurant. Premoli is featuring a menu of Sicilian dishes throughout October including a cured tuna with capers and the region’s classic caponata stew with eggplant and capers.
Olives, tomatoes, onions, basil and olive oil love in Pantelleria


Pleasures of 

Pantelleria 

If you haven’t been to Pantelleria or even heard of it, join the club.  I was invited by a non-profit food and nutrition organization called Old WaysPreservation and Exchange Trust to join a group of writers and culinary experts for a symposium to discover the island’s uniquely healthy food and lifestyle habits.  
It’s a desert out there. The island of Pantelleria gets very little rain fall. 
The rocky island is pummeled by the wind forcing olive trees, grape vines and caper bushes to lie low growing outward not upward. Citrus trees are cradled in walled gardens to protect the fruit.

“There’s still a little magic out there,” says Phil Meldrum of Food Match a specialty foods importer attending the symposium. “When you find something with a taste particular to that area it gives me goose bumps.”

 Pantelleria capers on freshly caught swordfish makes me swoon. 
Stone cliffs, stonewalls, stone buildings, and piles of stone create a harsh landscape surrounded by the crashing sea. Minimal rain means cactus blooms and bougainvillea blooms offer the only color. 

“It was frozen in time,” says dietitian Sharon Palmer, author of The Plant Powered Diet, “We had very little red meat. It’s primarily a plant based diet that’s nutritionally really balanced with carbs from pastas, healthy fats from almonds, olives and olive oil and dishes flavored with herbs, fennel and capers.”  
Sharon Palmer and I enjoying ‘studying’ nutrition on Pantelleria.
Other common cooking ingredients included eggplant, zucchini and tomatoes. Since cows were not a traditional part of farm life here, there is very little cheese and pasta dishes and potatoes are sprinkled with seasoned bread crumbs instead of parmesan.  
Just so you believe me. Pantescans add breadcrumbs to pasta.
Palmer notes, “We had traditional dishes handed down through the generations in an isolated farming environment so we had what they have there.” 
Even though there is a tradition of sweet cookies made in intricate patterns and shapes, the principal sweetener is made from reducing grape juice not refined sugar. 
“It’s nice that the healthiest traditional eating patterns happen to be the most delicious,” says Sara Baer-Sinnott, President of Oldways.   

Mediterranean Medicine

The health benefits of the Mediterranean diet – rich in vegetables, legumes, grains, nuts, seafood and olive oil – are well documented. Dietitian Kathy McManus, Director of the Department of Nutrition at Brigham & Women’s Hospital in Boston says, “Since this diet is not low in fat people enjoy the foods more, lose more weight and they tend to eat more vegetables because they can add olive oil.”  The Mediterranean lifestyle leads to longevity, too. 
Olive oil contains more than healthy fats, it’s rich in plant nutrients and antioxidants to promote good health.
Ligia Dominguez, MD of the University of Palermo says, “We want an active life in old age not frailty. The Mediterranean diet is high in antioxidants which can add years to your life and life to your years.”

Dominguez says being “kissed” by the sun for at least 15 minutes a day boosts vitamin D levels naturally and getting enough sleep is important too. “I took a nap every day in Pantelleria,” admits Baer-Sinnot, “It’s the joy of resting to reduce stress.”

Grape harvest bonanza during my stay on Pantelleria.


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The Italian Island of Capers, Olives and Wine

The gateway to discovery. Atlanta to Milan. Milan to Pantelleria.  

The Pleasures of Pantelleria. 
I’d never even heard of Pantelleria until I received an email inviting me to join a group of food writers, food purveyors and nutrition researchers for a trip with Oldways Preservation Exchange and Trust in September.
Oldways was founded to study and preserve the healthy ways folks used to eat and gather their food – from the mountains to the sea. 

Pantelleria. Don’t you just like saying it?Now find it. It’s an island off the coast of Sicily in the Mediterranean Sea not too far from Tunisia. This is about as south in southern Italy as you can get. There’s something irresistible about an invitation to someplace you’ve never heard of before. When I read that the island was famous for capers I replied to my hosts, “You had me at capers.”

Benvenuto!

Arriving alone at the slightly modernistic looking Pantelleria airport (most folks in our Old Ways group traveled from New York or Boston or LA through Rome) my 30-something taxi driver who spoke only “hello” and “thank you” English was quite busy chatting in Italian on his flip cell phone while we crossed the island past lots of rocks and cactus in bloom and sweeping views of the Mediterranean.

I took a photo of him and he smiled shyly. No, I don’t have a crush on you – I just haven’t seen anyone on a flip phone in a while. OK, on my best behavior. For now.

A tiny island of rough black, umber and grey volcanic rock soon softens to the eye with cascades of glorious flowers.

Purple and white bougainvillea abound.

 Stone walls are everywhere – Pantescan people are really good with rock. Tumbling out of crevices are long green tendrils that I soon learn are the mighty little plants that give us capers.  A little lemon and olive oil with this edible landscape and I’m ready to toss with pasta.
But, don’t be tempted to pluck a wild caper and sample – I’ll explain why later.

Caper plants spring boldly from boulders on Pantelleria.
This might be my favorite photo.
Sunset over the Mediterranean from my patio at The Mursia Hotel on Pantelleria. 

Alora, we arrive at the Mursia Hotel. The white washed building with a Moorish look  (we’re only 36 miles from North Africa here) rises above the black lava rock majestically without need of embellishment. Entering the breezy lobby my eye is drawn beyond the reception desk to what I had been dreaming of all day. A swimming pool. Palm trees were a bonus. It’s about 85 degrees outside.

Let me explain. The huge pool in the foreground is empty – an old pool once filled by the sea.
The new pool at The Mursia surrounded by palms and lounge chairs is nearer the hotel bar. Nirvana- a salt water pool.

So far the only Italian word I really like is “Alora!” which I think means OK or implies “what’s next?” or “then…”….which is like my favorite Spanish word “Entonces!” I will never work as a translator at the UN. But, I do know how to rally a group. “Alora! Time for a drink folks.”

Winery Owner Cologero Mannino of Abraxas offers up a taste of the island’s specialty – slightly sweet, nicely balanced  passito de Pantelleria wine.
How about another glass of wine? This is Italy. That’s better.
Alessandro Luchetti bound for Florida International University in January demonstrates his handsome host skills.
Starting to relax into the Mediterranean lifestyle. 
Stay tuned for the next post……as the pleasures of Pantelleria continue. 

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Old Notes from Italy

After so many 100 plus days, the rain, the thunder and the lightning began just as I was getting ready to load a cooler with drinks and head over to the country club to watch the traditional “secret” July 3rd Fireworks. I went upstairs to reconsider what I was going to wear – now that the grass will be damp and even muddy – and I stopped to look out of the window in the upper hallway. On the table are piles of my old journals. I picked up the first one and began to read…….

Cortona May 12, 1999
The roads are winding us down the hill as we leave Cortona heading for Sienna. I have been to the house written about in the book, Under the Tuscan Sun. Bramesole is the name which means yearning for the sun. I yearn for my house and the time to make it more beautiful and more like the houses I’ve seen today in Cortona.

Volpaia May 15, 1999
The view from my room is of a hillside dotted with silvery green olive trees reaching up to meet another slope of the long lines planted as vineyard. At the top of the hills sits a medieval village- Volpaia- with its 11th century stone tower and connected squares and roofs of houses and shops surrounding. It seems there is one of these clock tower stone villages every few miles in the distance and this morning, Sunday, the bells rang from all directions echoing the sound of Italy. We have seen fields dotted with poppies, roses huge and heavy climbing on so many walls. The colors of nature are abundant and are refreshingly free to ramble. Small flowering plants emerge from holes in the stone walls of houses or just from walls along the street. It makes me realize that we are too neat and tidy in our idea of gardens at home. Why kill the small violets and daisies in our lawns so the grass is perfect when the mix of nature is so pleasing and relaxed?
I hear the bells again. No particular time to mark – it’s 10:45 am and some church somewhere is chiming now. The tall cedars are so stately and graceful at the same time. Planted in rows to punctuate the landscape.

May 19, 1999

We are finished with our shooting and today is a relaxed dream day of rest. We are staying at another lovely small hotel, Le Piazza near Castellina in Chianti. My room has a view of another Tuscan valley rolling green, many tones of green. The grounds are so pretty with huge burst of yellow broom and rows of pink roses. The air is perfumed with the honeysuckle that climbs on stone walls.
The hotel is constructed from another old stone farmhouse. Terra cotta tiles and grey stone are the dominant colors of all the buildings here. The walls are white and the furniture dark wood. Here the owner has decorated with Ralph Lauren floral fabrics and chests and tables from Indonesia. It’s comfortable in a historically layered European way.
Crissy left at 10:30am today in a Mercedes driven by a hired driver to take her to the airport in Florence.
Ric and Chris, the photographer and sound man, left in the white nine seat van we’ve been driving around in all week. They are off to meet another CNN reporter who will do a story in Umbria then on to Venice.
I am exhausted but happy I came. I’m happy to have experienced this kind of beauty. I hope I can remember the details
We’ll see how much can be reproduced at home.

May 20, 1999 Thursday. Firenze!

I haven’t been here since I wandered the streets with Suzy and Leslie in 1976. Now I’m here with Jennifer and Jon. We’ve done a toast to our friendship. I want to remember the dishes – braised endive with smoked cheese and tomato on top.

I wish there was more……but that’s the end.


Note: I was traveling with CNN as senior correspondent, anchor of CNN Travel Now and we joined Lydia Bastianich who was with a group of American food lovers on a culinary tour of Tuscany.
Shall I post the CNN Travel Now show on my You Tube channel?


I regret not writing more in my journals while on trips with CNN – they kept us kind of busy.

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Marvelous Marche Region of Italy

Let the love of all things Italian continue…….. Under the Marche Sun.

You’ve probably been to Rome, Florence and Venice. And perhaps you’ve also toured the Amalfi Coast or walked the cliffs of the Cinque Terra. But, chances are you haven’t visited the Marche region on the east coast of Italy. The lavendar scented view above is taken from the lovely Hotel Emelia in Portonovo perched high above the Adriatic Sea.

Marche is a region brimming with culture, beauty, art, cuisine, wine and people who greet you with an attitude, “We’ve been waiting for you!” What the towns and villages of Marche do not have are crowded streets or long lines to get into museums and historic sights.

From stone country houses such as Locanda ca’ Andreana offering a dream sequence of farm fresh lunches to elegant evenings inspired by top Italian designs at Symposium restaurant ……… the Marche is yours to discover.

More to come…..ciao for now.

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